By Randy Gener[1]

Suzie Bastien © Courtesy of S. Bastien
Suzie Bastien © Courtesy of S. Bastien

Anyone seriously interested in French-language Quebec plays needs to know about Suzie Bastien.

Born in Montreal, the author of 10 plays and a member of Centre des auteurs dramatiques, Bastien writes some of the most intense, heart-stopping yet immeasurably tender dramas in today’s Canadian theatre—francophone plays whose potent lyricism demand everything actors and designers can imaginatively give but whose theatrical impact, in the right hands, can pack the emotional tug-of-war of powerful dreams.

No doubt, Quebecois plays translated into English usually do not survive the transition in a rendering that appeals to anglophone audiences. When Bastien made her first U.S. appearance as part of the 2012 hotINK at the Lark (a series of free public readings in New York of 10 new plays from around the world), a group of New York actors presented a staged reading of her The Medea Effect (Leffet Médée) which left some audience members openly asking, “How was this play originally staged in Quebec?”

It was a great question that spoke directly to the virtues of the English translation by Nadine Desrochers, first produced by Théâtre Blanc in Québec City in March 2005. Rendered in actable English, Desrochers’s translation of Bastein’s drama retains some of The Medea Effect’s abstractions yet stays true to its heart-stopping core. As the title clearly states, the play refers to the Euripides play, but its dramatic “plot” has little to do with original Athenian tragedy. If anything, its play-within-a-play motif is closer in spirit to the literary devices that Luigi Pirandello used in Six Characters in Search of an Author or Tennessee Williams used in The Two Character Play or David Ives used in Venus in Fur.

In other words, the fiction of the inner story (in this case the Euripides tragedy) is used to reveal the human truths in the outer story: Ugo is a director whose fixation on Euripides’s Medea is fueled by his own upset over being abandoned by his sick mother, and Ada is an actress who once played Medea on stage but left midway through the performance. Ada had also abandoned her son, which is why she is convinced that she is a monster born to play Medea.

Filled with self-loathing guilt that she has failed as a perfect mother, driven to achieve some kind of independent success in her career as a modern woman and an actor of purpose, Ada bursts into an audition for Medea 10 years after she herself played the character on stage. As the roller-coaster conversation between them unfolds, Ada sees in Ugo her ticket to finish what she had started. During this intense casting call, Ada demands that Ugo, along with the audience, to hear story. Soon the line between fantasy and reality becomes blurred, as the son without a mother confronts the mother without a son. Each forces the other to uncover the past. Amid this volatile encounter between an actor and a director at a casting call for Medea, Ada and Ugo recognize one another in each other’s pain and in their struggle to reclaim their existential places in the world.

Written between 2002 and 2005, The Medea Effect is Bastien’s contemporary apposite answer to the psychological charge and broader cultural impact of Euripides’s ancient tragedy. It can also be viewed as a feminist precursor to David Ives’s 2010 two-character Broadway play Venus in Fur, which bears a striking structural resemblance to her Quebecois play. These comparisons, however, do not begin to fully embrace the totality of Bastien’s lyrically charged dramaturgy, since only a few of her French-language plays have been translated into English, and her works have yet to receive their due outside of the francophone world.
I first met Bastien in France, in 2005. At the time, she was developing a new work, Après, in collaboration with a young theater company in Limoges. She was also basking in the glow of the success of her second play, LukaLila (Éditions Comp’act, 2002), which received an award from the Journées de Lyon des auteurs de théâtre in 2002 in France. The story of Siamese twins who, although they have been separated, continue to live united, as if one represented the soul and the other the body of the other twin, LukaLila had won the SACD de la dramaturgie francophone prize in 2004. Translated into Italian, the play received its first production not in Montreal but in Rome in 2005, the year our paths crossed.

Until The Medea Effect came along, her best-known work in Canada was Le désir de Gobi (Lux Éditeur, 2003). First produced by Théâtre de Quat’Sous (Montreal), in January 2000, then in Québec City, Ottawa, and Sherbrooke in 2004, Le désir de Gobi concerns Nine, a girl abandoned by her mother and held captive for a year by her father. Since the day the police discovered her, Nine has been surrounded by a flood of psychiatrists, and she has retreated into what she calls her secret room, where she relives the past, speaks to an imaginary companion and fantasizes of escaping to the Gobi Desert, where one can hear echoes of the voices of lost children.

« Le désir de Gobi » by Suzie Bastien, directed by Pierre Bernard, Théâtre de Quat'sous, Montral (Canada), 2000. © Courtesy of S. Bastien
« Le désir de Gobi » by Suzie Bastien, directed by Pierre Bernard, Théâtre de Quat’sous, Montral (Canada), 2000. © Courtesy of S. Bastien
« Le désir de Gobi » by Suzie Bastien, directed by Pierre Bernard, Théâtre de Quat'sous, Montral (Canada), 2000. © Courtesy of S. Bastien
« Le désir de Gobi » by Suzie Bastien, directed by Pierre Bernard, Théâtre de Quat’sous, Montral (Canada), 2000. © Courtesy of S. Bastien

Because of her gorgeous writing, Suzie Bastien has benefited greatly from the public funding she has received for her writing (for example, Conseil des arts et des Lettres du Québec, Canada Council for the Arts, Centre National du Livre in France and of course, Les Francophonies en Limousin). She’s spent a great deal of time at writers’ colonies, usually abroad. During the period of the following interview, she had just returned to La Chartreuse de Villeneuve-lès-Avignon colony where in 2004 she wrote Ceux qui lont connu. This new play, tentatively titled Quatre fois Gauvreau, is about the Canadian poet and playwright Claude Gauvreau. A sound poet who died in 1971, Gavreau deconstructed, reconstructed and invented vocabulary, creating a language he called “exploréen.”

All of this is to say that despite the fact that her plays have been produced in France, Italy, Belgium as well as some parts of Canada and Quebec, in a profound sense, Suzie Bastien’s poetically eloquent actors’ theatre remains, to some extent, a well-kept secret even in her own native Canada. I hope that our following conversation will serve to call change this state of affairs.

Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre
Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre

RANDY GENER: In your country/city, is there any major issue (for example, a contemporary social problem) that artists fail or neglect to address on stage? Why? Is this due to censorship, or to a blind spot in the community’s shared perception of the world—or to a community’s consciously or un-consciously avoiding it?

SUZIE BASTIEN : Quiconque connaît la situation politique particulière du Québec comprend à quel point le théâtre et les arts en général ont été influencés par les aspirations souverainistes de cette nation. Dans les années 70, les œuvres étaient teintées de cet espoir que l’avènement d’un parti indépendantiste avait fait naître. Puis, à la suite du référendum de 1980, où une légère majorité de Québécois a voté non à une éventuelle séparation du Québec du reste du Canada, les thèmes ont changé. Le théâtre est devenu plus introspectif, plus lyrique également. Puis, dans les années 90, on a vu émerger de jeunes auteurs plus intéressés à parler du couple, de la réalité, moins enclins à la poésie. Pour répondre à la question, je crois qu’un théâtre politique est devenu très difficile à écrire, parce que le Québec de 2013 semble perplexe face à cette question. De jeunes troupes émergent toutefois, avec des préoccupations sociales fortes. Mais on semble avoir remisé le nationalisme québécois, qui n’est plus du tout présent sur nos scènes. Cela pourrait revenir, mais devrait prendre une nouvelle forme.

What, if anything, is difficult in communicating with designers/directors/actors/playwrights? Why? How early and how often do you exchange views about the coming production? Could you describe the initial phase of your work method?

Je n’ai pas vraiment de contacts avec les acteurs, je n’en souhaite pas particulièrement. Si on souhaite me poser des questions, c’est bien, mais mon interlocuteur est le metteur en scène. Je m’en remets entièrement à son jugement. J’ai la prétention de croire que mes pièces sont assez écrites pour ne pas permettre au metteur en scène de faire n’importe quoi. Je ne vais jamais en répétition, je vois le spectacle lorsqu’il est en salle, le soir de la première. Je tente alors, tant bien que mal, de devenir spectatrice de mon texte.

Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre
Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre

Have you designed shows yourself, and if so, does that make communication easier?

Je n’ai jamais mis en scène un de mes textes, ça ne m’intéresse pas du tout ! Ce qui me passionne, c’est le lien créé avec le metteur en scène, un lien presque amoureux. Rien ne me plaît plus que de constater que la personne qui dirige parle de ma pièce comme si elle l’avait écrite. C’est vraiment ce que je préfère, à part écrire, bien sûr.

In your creative process, which part do you enjoy least? Why? How do you tackle it?

En vérité, ce que je trouve le plus difficile est de créer les conditions propices à l’écriture. Il me faut dégager du temps pour cela, mais je suis toujours en train de chercher des moyens de subsistance. J’ai fait le choix, il y a une dizaine d’années, de prioriser l’écriture dans ma vie. Cela signifie que je dois constamment organiser, entre deux boulots alimentaires, des longs moments d’écriture. En ce sens, les résidences sont idéales. Actuellement, j’écris de La Chartreuse de Villeneuve-lès-Avignon, un endroit splendide dédié aux écritures du spectacle. Cela signifie que durant un mois, je me consacre entièrement à mon travail d’écriture. Mais cela signifie également que dès mon retour à Montréal, je devrai trouver des contrats de rédaction, afin de pallier l’absence de revenus durant cette période. Lorsqu’on cherche du travail, il est difficile de revenir à l’écriture, qui demande du temps, de la réflexion.

Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre
Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre

In your work, where do characters come from? Talk for example about Luka Lila and The Medea Effect.

Au début de mon processus d’écriture, la plupart du temps, il n’y a pas de « personnages », que moi qui tente de mettre sur papier mes désirs, mes douleurs, mes questions, mes doutes : des textes qui ne sont pas du tout théâtraux. Les choses s’organisent en cours d’écriture, une voix s’élève. Un personnage se construit, en dialogue avec un autre. La dernière chose qui émerge est la fable. Par exemple, avecLukaLila, j’avais cette jeune fille qui racontait l’histoire d’une princesse qui puait des pieds. Par contraste, je lui ai opposé un garçon qui ne croyait en rien, mais qui écoutait ses histoires pour se consoler. De quoi, je ne savais pas. Puis, j’ai lu cet article dans le journal, où l’on racontait que deux jeunes clandestins avaient été retrouvés morts dans la cale d’un bateau, au port de Montréal. J’ai eu envie tout de suite d’imaginer leur histoire. Tout s’est mis en place, j’ai juste donné un contexte à mes personnages.

Pour Leffet Médée, J’avais écrit un monologue qui racontait la noyade d’un enfant, ce qui est devenu le long monologue d’Ada à la fin de la pièce. J’avais toujours voulu écrire sur le mythe de Médée, mais à la manière détournée de Jules Dassin par exemple, dans son magnifique film Cris de femmes, avec Ellen Burstyn et Melina Mercouri, qui présente une actrice devant jouer Médée allant à la rencontre d’une prisonnière qui a commis un infanticide. Dans ma pièce, de la tragédie initiale il reste cette femme qui a souhaité « perdre » son enfant, parce qu’il ressemblait trop au père qui l’a abandonnée. C’est devenu plutôt le drame d’une femme qui commet un oubli monstrueux, qui a cessé de vivre depuis. Donc, une femme s’identifiait au personnage de Médée. Et puis, autre fantasme, je désirais montrer la relation si particulière entre un metteur en scène et une actrice. La fin était déjà écrite, ne me restait qu’à construire cette relation menant à une révélation.

Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre
Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre

Why or how did you become a theatre artist? What was the impetus? How have you changed as an artist from the first time you had wanted to become one to what you are now today?

Je suis issue d’une famille très modeste, je ne voyais de moyen de sortir de la pauvreté qu’en étant artiste. Je l’ai compris très rapidement. Le talent n’est pas l’apanage d’une seule classe sociale. Même si les opportunités d’être remarqué en tant qu’artiste ou écrivain sont plus nombreuses lorsqu’on est issu d’une classe sociale plus élevée, je le constate maintenant. Mais à la base, je sentais que c’était possible. Et le théâtre… je voulais au départ jouer. J’ai joué, mais je n’aimais pas tant être sur scène, ce qui demande une bonne dose d’exhibitionnisme. L’écriture était présente depuis très longtemps, j’ai été d’abord une lectrice vorace, mais j’avais peur de m’y mettre, je trouvais extrêmement prétentieux de me dire « écrivain ». « Auteure », ça va !

Catherine Rousseau, Marc-André Charette and Patrick Quintal « Le désir de Gobi » by Suzie Basiten, directed by Gill Champagne, a production of Théâtre du Trillium in Ottawa (Canada). In co-production with the Théâtre Blanc (Quebec) and Théâtre du Double Signe (Sherbrooke). In collaboration with the Secretariat for Canadian Intefovernmental Affairs, 2004. © Théâtre du Trillium
Catherine Rousseau, Marc-André Charette and Patrick Quintal « Le désir de Gobi » by Suzie Basiten, directed by Gill Champagne, a production of Théâtre du Trillium in Ottawa (Canada). In co-production with the Théâtre Blanc (Quebec) and Théâtre du Double Signe (Sherbrooke). In collaboration with the Secretariat for Canadian Intergovernmental Affairs, 2004. © Théâtre du Trillium

Your best known work in Canada is Le désir de Gobi, first produced by Theatre de Quat’Sous in Montreal in 2000, then in Quebec City, Ottawa and Sherbrooke in 2004. Would you describe the life of plays in production in Montreal as vibrant? What are your struggles as a playwright? For example, are you able to make money for work? What is the typical life of your play after its first premiere?

Plusieurs questions ! Premièrement, je dirais que la scène montréalaise est assez vivante et active. Beaucoup de jeunes compagnies naissent chaque année. Mais ont-elles le soutien nécessaire pour durer ? Beaucoup meurent assez rapidement. La notion de continuité est assez difficile au Québec, les gouvernements n’octroient que très peu aux arts en général. Et il n’y a pas (ou très peu) de systèmes privés de dons.

Je ne suis pas affiliée à une compagnie en particulier. Les metteurs en scène sont toujours à l’affût du nouvel auteur, de celui que les autres ne connaissent pas. De la saveur du mois. Les jeunes auteurs sont en général membres de compagnies qui produisent leurs textes. Ma plus grande difficulté est de faire lire mes textes à des directeurs ou des metteurs en scène. Je ne suis plus une inconnue, je ne suis plus fraiche et neuve… Comment convaincre de lire ? Je ne sais pas.

« Le désir de Gobi » by Suzie Basiten, directed by Gill Champagne, a production of Théâtre du Trillium in Ottawa (Canada). In co-production with the Théâtre Blanc (Quebec) and Théâtre du Double Signe (Sherbrooke). In collaboration with the Secretariat for Canadian Intergovernmental Affairs, 2004. © Théâtre du Trillium
« Le désir de Gobi » by Suzie Basiten, directed by Gill Champagne, a production of Théâtre du Trillium in Ottawa (Canada). In co-production with the Théâtre Blanc (Quebec) and Théâtre du Double Signe (Sherbrooke). In collaboration with the Secretariat for Canadian Intergovernmental Affairs, 2004.
© Théâtre du Trillium

You have written a series of short plays called L’effritement 1 et 2. They were produced in Paris. Can you share more about these plays? Are their themes typical of your other work?

Il s’agissait d’une commande. La compagnie Gare au Théâtre a fait durant quelques années un événement appelé « Les petites comédies de l’eau ». Ils prenaient un cours d’eau, lançaient un appel à des auteurs vivant près de ce cours d’eau. Cette année-là (1987) était « l’année du Fleuve Saint-Laurent ». On demandait d’écrire une ou deux courtes pièces de plus ou moins 10 minutes chacune. Avec deux autres auteurs de Montréal, j’ai été choisie. Mes deux pièces ont été jouées sous chapiteau en juillet 2007.

Comme il s’agissait de commande, mon style est assez différent. Je me suis inspirée des dramaticules de Beckett pour l’écriture de ces deux pièces : deux petits vieux au bord de ce qui était jadis un fleuve ont perdu la mémoire de l’eau, s’effritent tranquillement dans la sécheresse et l’oubli.

Who and what have acted as influences on you or your work?

Lorsque j’ai lu pour la première fois Bernard-Marie Koltès, j’ai compris que je ne pouvais plus penser l’écriture théâtrale de la même manière. Avant lui, je trouvais les auteurs français trop littéraires, pas assez « scéniques ». Les auteurs français mettent la parole en scène. Au Québec, un peu comme aux États-Unis, le dialogue fait avancer l’action, est affaire de rythme, la fable est ce qui importe. Pour schématiser encore plus, je dirais que les Français sont de grands stylistes, les Nord-Américains de grands raconteurs (storytellers). Avec Koltès, je trouve le meilleur des deux mondes. J’aimerais tendre vers une écriture poétique, mais au service de la fable.

Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre
Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre

Is there one play or production that you think you’ve learned the most from? What did you learn?

J’ai appris de chacune quelque chose de différent. Chaque fois que je termine une pièce (ce qui est de plus en plus long et difficile ; j’arrive de plus en plus difficilement à m’avouer vaincue !), je me dis qu’elle n’est pas le fantasme que j’en avais au départ, mais que j’en suis là, que la prochaine pièce je m’approcherai plus de mon idéal de pièce. Au fil des années, je trouve le processus d’écriture de plus en plus complexe, de moins en moins spontané. Pour répondre plus concrètement à la question, chaque fois, j’apprends mes limites. Ce qui n’est pas très agréable.

Avec ma pièce Lenfant revenant, j’ai appris à ne rien attendre d’une pièce. Pour l’écriture de cette pièce, j’ai été auteure en résidence dans un grand théâtre de Québec. Elle a fait l’objet de plusieurs lectures, au Québec comme en France. Elle a suscité de grands éloges, de très bons metteurs en scène m’ont dit qu’ils souhaitaient la monter. Une maison d’édition reconnue m’a demandée de lui envoyer le texte, elle voulait le publier ; à la dernière minute elle a changé d’avis. Finalement, elle n’a été jouée que deux soirs dans une petite salle de Belgique. Le travail d’auteur dramatique est souvent fait de désillusions, d’attentes, d’espoirs sans cesse déçus, mais aussi, parfois, de belles surprises.

Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre
Eloi ArchamBaudoin and Jennifer Morehouse in «The Meda Effect» by, translated by Nadine Desrochers, directed by Emma Tibaldo, Talisman Theatre, Montreal (Canada), October 2012 © Talisman Theatre

How does the Francophone theatre in Montreal look from your perspective? Would you still be an artist if you had to start out today all over again?

Je ne sais pas. Franchement. Cette vie est si difficile à vivre au quotidien… Pour une miette de reconnaissance, que de longues plages de découragement ! Je ne suis pas une auteure à succès, les bonnes nouvelles arrivent généralement après beaucoup de travail, elles ne se suivent pas l’une après l’autre. Entre chaque résidence, production, lecture, de très longues périodes de demandes de bourses, d’envois de textes, de courriels, d’envois à des concours… Ce travail de « représentation » est exténuant, il faut croire en ses chances, en son talent. Je ne suis pas une personne très assurée, je ne crois que très peu souvent en mes capacités. Il n’y a qu’au moment où j’écris que je me sens pleinement à ma place, que je ne me pose pas de question sur ma pertinence en tant qu’auteure.

« LukaLila » by Suzie Bastien, produced by Compagnie Bricole, presented at Le théatre Funambule Montmartre in Paris (France), May 2008, and Le Vélodrome at LA Rochelle, November 2008. © Courtesy of S. Bastien
« LukaLila » by Suzie Bastien, produced by Compagnie Bricole, presented at Le théatre Funambule Montmartre in Paris (France), May 2008, and Le Vélodrome at LA Rochelle, November 2008. © Courtesy of S. Bastien

You wrote the play Ceux qui l’ont connu while in residence at la Chartreuse de Villeneuve-lès-Avignon colony in 2004. You have now returned to this place again. What new play are you working on in France right now? What do you get from the experience of staying in writers’ colonies?

J’écris une pièce intitulée Quatre fois Gauvreau. Claude Gauvreau est un poète, dramaturge, critique d’art, né à Montréal en 1925, mort en 1971. Il fait la rencontre du peintre Paul-Émile Borduas qui est le chef de file du groupe des peintres automatistes. Gauvreau est le seul écrivain signataire de Refus Global, un pamphlet célèbre au Québec, dans lequel Borduas fait l’apologie de l’inconscient en art, rejette l’immobilisme artistique québécois où toute manifestation doit être approuvée par le clergé. En 1947, Gauvreau présente sa première pièce, Bien-être. Au cours de sa vie, il fait de longs séjours en hôpital psychiatrique. Très remarqué lors de la mythique Nuit de la poésie du 27 mars 1970, il lit des poèmes à moitié en exploréen, un langage qu’il a inventé. Peu avant le triomphe de sa pièce Les oranges sont vertes par le TNM, peu avant la publication de ses œuvres complètes, Gauvreau est retrouvé mort devant son immeuble. J’écris quatre rencontres avec des personnes importantes de sa vie : sa « muse » Muriel, sa mère, le peintre Borduas et un jeune poète. Réalité et fiction se côtoient.
Je suis en train de terminer ce que j’espère être la version finale de la pièce. J’y travaille depuis un an. Il y a eu quelques mois de recherche, deux autres versions. Je suis à La Chartreuse pour un mois. C’est le paradis des écrivains ! Tout est mis en œuvre pour que nous puissions travailler en paix. L’endroit, un monastère du 13e siècle, est splendide. Et les autres résidents sont tous des auteurs de théâtre. Les discussions sont riches, des lectures sont organisées… C’est pour ces moments que je me dis que mon métier est merveilleux.

What are your plans for the future? Goals? Productions? Career dreams? Fantasies?

Simplement poursuivre mon travail d’écriture. Qu’on me donne les moyens de le poursuivre.

Suzie Bastien © Le Centre des Ecritures Dramatiques Wallonie-Bruxelles
Suzie Bastien © Le Centre des Ecritures Dramatiques Wallonie-Bruxelles

Suppose you wish to entice or interest someone who may not be familiar with your work. What would you say if they ask, “What kind of playwright are you? What is your style?”

J’essaie de raconter des histoires en y mettant de la poésie. Je mets souvent en scène des personnages englués dans le réel, des êtres ayant vécu le pire, qui arrivent à supporter la vie grâce à la magie ou la féerie de certains moments. Qui arrivent à traverser des cauchemars et à demeurer vivants grâce à la beauté, à la puissance de leur imaginaire. Ou bien parce qu’ils arrivent à hurler leur désespoir à la face d’un autre humain. Comment obtenir une pièce à la fois réaliste et stylisée, c’est la question que je me pose chaque fois.


Gener
[1] Randy Gener is a founding editor of Critical Stages/Scènes critiques, an award-winning writer, a freelance dramaturge, and an artist in New York City. He is World News Editor of The Journalist.ie, Series Editor of NoPassport Press, and Founder of In the Culture of One World (CultureofOneWorld.org), a cross-media project devoted to cultural diplomacy and international exchange. A former Village Voice contributor and cultural critic, Gener received the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism, among other prestigious awards, for his essays and editorial work in American Theatre magazine. He recently won the 2013 Plaridel Award for Outstanding Editorial Essay from the Philippine American Press Club USA and was named a 2013 Wai Look Award Finalist for Outstanding Service to the Arts by Asian American Arts Alliance. Author of the plays “Love Seats for Virginia Woolf” and “Wait for Me at the Bottom of the Pool,” Gener served from 2007 to 2012 as the curatorial producer/adviser of “From the Edge: Performance Design in the Divided States of America,” the USA National Exposition in the 2011 Prague Quadrennial of Performance Space and Design in the Czech Republic. www.randygener.org

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
« Comment obtenir une pièce à la fois réaliste et stylisée, c’est la question que je me pose chaque fois » — Interview with Suzie Bastien, Quebec Playwright from Canada