Egypt—Subversive Theology in Nawal El Saadawi’s Quest for Justice

Egypt—Subversive Theology in Nawal El Saadawi’s Quest for Justice

Omolola A. Ladele* For thousands of years most of the philosophers and thinkers, all of whom were men, have been so blinded, by their “patriarchal cataract” and class optics, that their sight and their insight could not penetrate the time

In Search of Theatre for Development in Malawi: a Modern History

In Search of Theatre for Development in Malawi: a Modern History

Zindaba Chisiza* Theatre at the University of Malawi was initiated by the Department of English at the university’s Chancellor College campus, in 1967 (Gibbs 1980: 67). The first play to be staged was Wole Soyinka’s The Trials of Brother Jero,

Nigeria—The Challenge of (and for) the Female Playwright

Nigeria—The Challenge of (and for) the Female Playwright

Onyeka Iwuchukwu*   Playwriting and Publishing Playwriting in Nigeria, like other forms of literary creativity, was dominated by male writers before the emergence of women writers. The first published play by Ene Henshaw was in 1954, while the first published

Uganda—From Research to Activism: Theatre and Anthropology in Walukuba

Uganda—From Research to Activism: Theatre and Anthropology in Walukuba

Katie McQuaid* and Jane Plastow**   Jane: Introduction This article is about our work as part of a larger AHRC-funded project called INTERSECTION.[1] The wider project works across Uganda, the UK and China, investigating how urban populations understand environmental change,

Nigeria—Revisiting Language in Two Wole Soyinka Plays

Nigeria—Revisiting Language in Two Wole Soyinka Plays

Dele Layiwola* But when we understand the nature of language in terms of expression, we give it a more comprehensive definition by incorporating expression, as one among many activities, into the total economy of those achievements by which man makes

South Africa—Towards Collective Action: Improvised Performance Jozi Style

South Africa—Towards Collective Action: Improvised Performance Jozi Style

Sarah Roberts* and Kieran Reid**   A visit to the significant places and spaces that mark the shaping of a society is always a moving experience. You leave with a better experience of understanding the turmoil involved in establishing a

South Africa—Theatre Lost, Performance Found?

South Africa—Theatre Lost, Performance Found?

Loren Kruger* In 2006, years before South African critic Brent Meersman lamented in this journal (2013) that theatre had been crushed between state indifference and crass commercialism, Malcolm Purkey, then artistic director of the Market Theatre in Johannesburg, remarked ironically

French Language Theatre in Africa: Connecting to the Francophonie

French Language Theatre in Africa: Connecting to the Francophonie

Ousmane Diakhaté* The sub-Saharan countries referred to as francophone Black Africa actually divide into four groups: the countries of the former French West Africa; the countries of the former French Equatorial Africa; the former French colonies of the Indian Ocean;

The Roots of African Theatre Ritual and Orality in the Pre-Colonial Period*

The Roots of African Theatre Ritual and Orality in the Pre-Colonial Period*

Ousmane Diakhaté** and Hansel Ndumbe Eyoh*** Theatre is one of the cultural elements that best exemplifies Africa. It is at the crossroads of the sacred and the profane, orality and the written word, of inner roots and external adjuncts. The

Anglophone Africa—Looking Back: The Beginnings of the Modern

Anglophone Africa—Looking Back: The Beginnings of the Modern

Hansel Ndumbe Eyoh* It is now generally accepted that there is something called anglophone African theatre, just as it is accepted that there is something called European or American theatre. Ever since Nigerian Wole Soyinka won the 1986 Nobel Prize,